Symposium on Religion in Medicine

Washington University, March 24-25, 2003

Abstracts & Bios 

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Topics list

Quick Index: Speakers

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Acupuncture
(Dr. Todd Frisch)
Tuesday, March 25th, 7:10-7:50pm, Ursa's Fireside Lounge

Speaker: Dr. Frisch practices acupuncture.

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Aromatherapy: Theory and Practice
(Janis Yakopovic)
Monday, March 24th, 9:30-10:00pm, Mudd Residential Hall, Conference Rooms A and B

Speaker: Janis Yakopovic practices aromatherapy at Mystic Valley in St. Louis, and writes a column on aromatherapy for Pathfinder Magazine (she will have copies of this magazine to distribute on both Monday and Tuesday). She was disabled with Crohn's Disease for 27 years. Four years ago she founded an alternative support group, called "Coping With Illness." She became interested in alternative modalities quite late in her recovery.

Abstract: Janis Yakopovic will introduce the theory and demonstrate the practice of aromatherapy, with a variety of aromatic oils and herbs. She will address issues of safety and efficacy, and how aromatherapy aided in her own recovery.

(Picture taken on 3/24/03, Sophia/ATMA Religion in Medicine Symposium)

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Ayurveda: The Traditional Medicine of India (An Expedition in Search of Medicinal Plants) (Video)
(Dr. Narayan "Anil" Patel)
Monday, March 24th, 9-9:30pm, Mudd Residential Hall, Conference Rooms A and B

Abstract: Ayurveda literally means knowledge of life. Ayurveda collectively encompasses medicinal, psychological, cultural, religious, and philosophical concepts. It is a holistic approach that has as its goal a long, healthy, and happy life. Today, some 70-80% of the people in India follow the ayurvedic approach to health care The knowledge of the traditional medicine of the Indian subcontinent has been accumulated during 3000-5000 years. Early records of sporadic observations on the efficacy and the therapeutic values of the plants are found in Vedas, the books of knowledge. More detailed compilations of observations were systematically done and recorded later. A disease will manifest different symptoms in persons with different constitutions. Therefore, the treatment is varied. In understanding and appreciating ayurveda, one must remember that ayurveda is a traditional medical system. It takes the whole human body in to account in assessing illness. Ayurveda rarely treats the symptoms but attempts to cure the disease on a permanent basis. This health care system acknowledges that some diseases may be caused by invisible minute life forms (germs). Ayurveda does not treat patients, however, with harsh chemicals to destroy causal organisms. Instead, it tries to enhance immunity by medication and dietary approaches.

Speaker: Dr. Patel received his PhD in Toxicology and Biochemistry from the University of Minnesota, St. Paul in 1959.

Dr. Patel's professional career was profoundly influenced by the catastrophic effects of famine, malaria, and cholera. His research was motivated by the desire to provide better food and health care, leading to focus on two disciplines: agriculture and pharmaceuticals.

He is an authority on the traditional medicine of South and Southeast Asia, and produced a video documentary, "Ayurveda: The Traditional Medicine of India," documenting the collection of medicinal plants by members of an expedition which he organized and led (we will show this video at the Sophia Religion in Medicine Symposium). Dr. Patel has also done extensive research in the fields of entomology and biochemistry, and has studied the significance of oral chemical sensations influencing internal physiological and biochemical processes: i.e. the scientific study of taste, including bitter, astringent, and pungent spices, and their role in enhancing natural immunity. Dr. Patel has identified plants from Ayurvedic medicine with promise for the treatment of cataracts, cancer, and AIDS, among other diseases.

Dr. Patel has taught an Ayurveda course with a laboratory component (Ayurvedic Medicine: Concepts, Principles and Practice) for the University of Pennsylvania's Department of South Asia Regional Studies (SARS), where he is a visiting professor. He advised the organizers of the Penn-in-India Program on their summer Ayurveda course in Pune, India. He serves as an advisor on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, as a member of the Alternative Medicine Systems Working Group. Dr. Patel participates in developing and implementing content across UME, GME, and CME related to Ayurvedic Medicine. Dr.Patel is an internationally recognized expert in the field of Ayurvedic Medicine and President and CEO of Ayurveda, Inc., a non-profit organization whose primary goal is to promote Ayurvedic education and research training for health professionals. In this role, he has developed affiliations with India's major Ayurvedic Institutions and Universities and has led four separate, six-week expeditions of health professionals to India to study medicinal plants and their efficacy against disease. Recently, Dr. Patel has been invited to serve as the keynote speaker for more than five international conferences devoted to CAM.

Note: Dr. Patel is unable to travel to St. Louis at this time, but he is available and willing to give advice to serious students of Ayurveda, especially premeds who plan to pursue an MD with training in Ayurveda. Please email Dr. Jerome Bauer at JeromBauer@aol.com, or call 314-725-1470. He has the equipment for a teleconference. Dr. Patel will also speak for approximately 30 minutes by telephone with attendees of the Sophia/ATMA Religion in Medicine Symposium; see Arun Padmanabhan's presentation, Tuesday 9-9:30.

(See also Dr. Fields' presentation).

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Chiropractic
(Dr. Todd Frisch)
Tuesday, March 25th, 7:10-7:50pm, Ursa's Fireside Lounge

Speaker: Dr. Frisch is a trained Chiropractor.

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Chinese Medicine
(Dr. Todd Frisch)
Tuesday, March 25th, 7:10-7:50pm, Ursa's Fireside Lounge

Speaker: Dr. Todd Frisch practices acupuncture and Chinese medicine.

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Christian Holistic Healing and Chinese Medicine
(Dr. Todd Frisch)
Tuesday, March 25th, 7:10-7:50pm, Ursa's Fireside Lounge

Speaker: Dr. Todd Frisch integrates Christian spirituality into his practice of medicine. He graduated Summa Cum Laude from Palmer College of Chiropractic in Davenport, Iowa, December 1980. He has maintained a private practice in St. Louis since 1981 specializing in Nutritional Counseling, Homeopathy, and Oriental Medicine. Dr. Frisch is Fellow of the International Academy of Clinical Acupuncturists (F.I.A.C.A.), and a Fellow of the Acupuncture Society of America (F.A.S.A.). He has had approximately 2500 hours of Post Grad Training/Study in Oriental Medicine, approximately 700 hours of Post Grad Training/Study in Nutrition, and 20 years of practice using Homeopathy, Iridology, and Bio Energetic Synchronization Technique (B.E.S.T.). Private practice (by referral only) in Chesterfield, Missouri for 22 years specializing in complementary, alternative, and preventative medicine.

(See also Doyle Cozadd's presentation),

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Complementary and Alternative Medicine
(Arun Padmanabhan, Washington University)
Tuesday, March 25th, 9:00-9:30pm, Ursa's Fireside Lounge

Abstract: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) is increasingly accepted by the medical establishment. For example, the National Institute of Health (NIH) has a CAM webpage, and the American Medical Student Association (AMSA) has a webpage offering advice to medical students on how to organize a grass roots "CAM Forum" (like this one!). This talk will first provide an overview of the field, then focus on Ayurveda, India's traditional medicine, and other systems of humanistic medicine. He will then lead the attendees in a speakerphone teleconversation with Dr. Anil Patel.

Speaker: Arun Padmanabhan is an undergraduate planning a career in medicine, with a certificate in CAM (Complementary and Alternative Medicine). Arun is an active member of ASHOKA: The Indian Students Association and ATMA: The Hindu Students Association, as well as co-chair of Sophia's Religion in Medicine Symposium Organizing Committee.

(See also Dr. Fields' and Dr. Patel's presentations).

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Holistic and Herbal Veterinary Medicine: Two Case Studies
(Dr. Anne Broeder)
Tuesday, March 25th, 8:20-9:00pm, Ursa's Fireside Lounge

Abstract: Dr. Broeder will present two case studies in which traditional Western veterinary medicine was successfully integrated with acupuncture,Chinese herbal medicine, Native American medicine, and homeopathy.

Speaker: Anne Broeder, D.V.M, was born and raised in St. Louis and received her veterinary degree in 1991 from the University of Florida School of Veterinary Medicine. Her field of expertise is veterinary acupuncture, which she practices on dogs and horses. She is certified by the International Veterinary Acupuncture Society. Dr. Broeder offers holistic therapies for animal health and healing. She practices veterinary medicine in St. Louis.

Brochures for the Animal Health and Healing clinic will be available on both Monday and Tuesday, or download, page one and page two.

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Mind, World, and Responsibility
(Wilt Schonbein, Washington University)
Tuesday, March 25th, 6:30-7:10pm, Ursa's Fireside Lounge

Abstract: Within the western intellectual tradition, it is commonplace to conceive of ourselves as distinct from the world: We may act in the world, but we are not quite part of it. However, recent developments in neuroscience and artificial intelligence suggest that we may be integrated much more closely into our environment than previously thought. In this talk I summarize a number of these developments, and draw several implications concerning the nature of minds in the world. In addition, I suggest that these developments have interesting consequences relating to our understanding of responsibility towards other persons.

Speaker: Professor Wilt Schonbein is a specialist on robotic and cyborg medicine. He received his PhD in 2002 from Washington University's Philosophy / Neuroscience / Psychology Program, with a dissertation entitled "An Intimate Affair: Cognition and its Physical Basis."He currently teaches in the Philosophy Department of Washington University. Professor Schonbein's courses include "Introduction to Cognitive Science," and "Introduction to Logic and Critical Analysis." His areas of specialization include philosophy of mind, philosophy of cognitive science, philosophy of artificial intelligence. His areas of concentration include logic, philosophy of science, and philosophy of language.

Professor Schonbein's current work in the PNP Robot Lab focuses on the question, what is the relation between behavior and cognition? In particular, he and his colleagues are investigating the potential for so-called "reactive" systems to exhibit more 'cognitive' behavior, such as the capacity to execute plans. For more information on this research program, see Professor Schonbein's webpage and CV. His work involved developing the khepera_vehicle program. Khepera_vehicle allows users to design (by hand) artificial neural network controllers for autonomous robots - a summary is located on the khepera_vehicle page. The program has been used primarily in an educational setting, for illustrating how various conceptual schemes can account for the same behavior. The code, manual, and a technical report detailing some simple projects and their philosophical implications are available for download from the khepera_vehicle page. In addition, the Khep_core package (a set of C++ classes for serial port communication with a Khepera robots) is also available. The code has been tested under various versions of Redhat Linux running on I386 boxes. Please visit the khepera_vehicle page.

Professor Schonbein's work in progress includes several papers and reviews, e.g. 'Cognition and its Physical Basis,' 'The Classicism / Connectionism Debate Revisited', 'Mechanism and Multiple Realization', and 'Review of Michael Cole's Cultural Psychology.'

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Qi Gong and Chinese Energy Manipulation Techniques
(Doyle Cozadd)
Tuesday, March 25th, 9:30-10:00pm, Ursa's Fireside Lounge

Abstract: Qi Gong is a Chinese technique of energy manipulation.

Speaker: Doyle Cozadd is a practitioner of Yan Xin Qi Gong and Chinese Martial Arts, which he began to practice in a Bible college in central Missouri, where he also became interested in the works of Carlos Castaneda. Mr. Cozadd is a practicing Christian, who earned his BA in Ministry / New Testament Studies from Central Christian College, Moberly, Missouri, in 1977. He holds a BSEd in Chemistry Education from Truman State, awarded in 1980. He has been a student of martial arts since 1973, including Taekwondo, Judo, Moodukwan and a Northern Shaolin Kung Fu system (since 1976). His resume is online at http://artsci.wustl.edu/~dcozadd/resume.html.

(See also Dr. Frisch's presentation).

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Religion as Medicine in the the Native Northwest Coast: Comparisons to Hindu Religious Therapeutics
(Dr. Gregory P. Fields, Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville)
Monday, March 24th, 6:30-7:10pm, Mudd Residential Hall, Conference Rooms A and B

Abstract: Professor Fields will deliver a Microsoft PowerPoint presentation based on his book, "Religious Therapeutics: Body and Health in Yoga, Ayurveda, and Tantra," and subsequent research. He will attempt to explain the connection between religion and medicine in the Native Northwest Coast, based on the Hindu traditions of Yoga, Ayurveda, and Tantra.

Speaker: Gregory Fields received the Ph.D. in Comparative Philosophy from the University of Hawaii in 1994. He is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, in comparative philosophy and religious studies, with specialization in South Asian and American Indian traditions. He teaches in the Department of Philosophical Studies. Professor Fields joined the SIUE faculty in 1995, with a teaching focus in multicultural and interdisciplinary studies, and critical thinking.He is faculty advisor for the new interdisciplinary minor in Religious Studies. He chairs Friends of the Religious Center at SIUE, founded to help the Center increase its programs in religious education, practice, and interfaith cooperation.

Professor Fields is author of Religious Therapeutics: Body and Health in Yoga, Ayurveda, and Tantra (State University of New York Press, 2001), and published in India by Motilal Banarsidass Press (2002). Other publications include a chapter on the purification rite or sweatlodge in The Black Elk Reader (Syracuse University Press, 2000), which addresses problems of misappropriation of indigenous traditional knowledge. Presentations include "American Indian Homeland: Exploitation of Land and of Indigenous Environmental Philosophy" at the Eighth East-West Philosophers' Conference in Honolulu. In August 2000, he presented "Healing the Body Politic: Dharma and Social Justice in Ambedkar's Response to Gandhi" in Calcutta, India.

Professor Fields' central research interest is religious therapeutics -relations between religion and healing,and application of philosophies of healing in the domains of medicine, psychology, education, and socio-political life. He has continuing interests in native Northwest Coast healing and spirituality, and in the work of Carl G. Jung. His current research interest is Tibetan Buddhist psychotherapeutics.

Red Cedar Circle Photo Gallery

Red Cedar Circle Links Page

Flier for Celebration of World Faiths, Saturday, March 22 2003, 7-9pm, The Religious Center at SIU-Edwardsville.

(See also the presentations of Danica Anderson, Arun Padmanabhan, Dr. Fields, Dr. Patel, and the Red Cedar Circle of Southern Illinois).

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Red Cedar Circle: Medicine Circle and Songs of the SiSiWiss Medicine Way of the Native Northwest Coast
(Red Cedar Circle of Southern Illinois)
Monday, March 24th, 7:10-7:50pm, Mudd Residential Hall, Conference Rooms A and B

Abstract: SiSíWiss is one of many spiritual medicine ways of the native Northwest coast. One meaning of 'medicine' is spiritual power that is healing. SiSíWiss originates in the Pacific Northwest in the region of the San Juan islands around Seattle and Vancouver Island. In the Samish language, the word SiSíWiss means "sacred breath, sacred life" (si: sacred, wiss: breath). Red Cedar Circle is another native name for the SiSíWiss medicine society. Red represents the blood of Mother Earth, the life-force. Cedar is very sacred to the people, it is burned for blessing; the smoke carries the prayers. The circle is sacred, everything in nature moves in a circle.

Quoting Johnny Moses, of the Tulalip Nation:

"There are so many different types of medicine in the Northwest Coast…different types of medicine circles or societies. When I was growing up, I was raised in many different types of societies. A lot of them I'm not allowed to talk about because of tradition.

The type of medicine that we call SiSíWiss is a medicine that is shared to anyone; to help anyone that is in need, anyone who is having a hard time, or who wants to use healing-- if they want to use it in their artwork or music, or hands-on healing, or visiting people, they learn this type of medicine that we are sharing today. The Red Cedar Circle is an open circle, open to the people because of the prophecies of our grandmothers and grandfathers that are coming true. They say that the Teachings are going to go out and reach people because we are getting closer to the changes of the earth, the destructions, poisons that are being put into the earth. The people in this medicine are going to be able to help people, to heal the earth and each other, to help with the suffering that is going on. We are trying to share in many places. There are four of us younger people from our country, from the Northwest Coast, who were sent by our elders to share the medicine with people who wanted to follow it in a good way, to be clean and to help brothers and sisters, and especially to help yourself. That is why is follow this medicine."

Along with practice of SiSíWiss medicine in native communities in the Northwest, there are a number of Red Cedar Circles in the U.S. and Canada, mainly in the West. The Red Cedar Circle of Southern Illinois has been meeting for 7 years to study and practice SiSíWiss medicine, and we have hosted Johnny Moses five times, for public gatherings and to help our circle. We hold an open Red Cedar Circle for song, prayer, and Teachings, once a month, and all are welcome. The gathering is held the first Saturday of the month (except January) at the Religious Center (the geodesic dome) at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. Potluck at 1pm, Medicine Circle at 2pm. The main way of praying and doing healing work in this tradition is song. We are blessed to have heard and learned many songs. There are healing songs (with and without drumming), songs for the four seasons, chants in the native languages, and Indian Shaker songs, which use handbells instead of drums.

At Washington University on March 24th, we will hold a Red Cedar Medicine Circle with the participation of those in attendance. This song ceremony is one of many SiSíWiss healing ceremonies . The singing of medicine songs-- and hearing and feeling them-- and the spirits of the songs, are all considered in this tradition to have healing power. It is a ceremony of reverence, in thanks to the Spirit and to the Mother Earth, and a way to request help in hearing the Teachings of the Spirit and the Mother Earth. It is also a ceremony of laughter and fellowship, and a celebration of the abundance and joy of our human life.

Speakers: The Red Cedar Circle of Southern Illinois.

Red Cedar Circle Photo Gallery

Red Cedar Circle Links Page

Link to Red Cedar Circle Homepage

Flier for Celebration of World Faiths, Saturday, March 22 2003, 7-9pm, The Religious Center at SIU-Edwardsville.

(See also Dr. Fields' and Danica Anderson's presentations).

(Pictures taken on 3/24/03, Sophia/ATMA Religion in Medicine Symposium)

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Tibetan Ethnobotany of Sacred Sites on Meri (Medicine Mountains): Vegetation, Useful Plants, and Endemic Plants
(Danica Anderson, Washington University; Co-Authors: Jan Salick, PhD, Trisha Consiglio, Jessica Woo, Missouri Botanical Garden; Wu Ruidong, The Nature Conservancy)
Monday, March 24th, 8:20-9:00pm, Mudd Residential Hall, Conference Rooms A and B

Abstract: Tibetan Doctors of Meri (Medicine Mountains), state that sacred sites protect populations of useful plants. We test this hypothesis using GIS analyses with geographic, vegetation, and sacred site layers along with tables of useful and endemic plants. Vegetation, useful plants and endemic plants characteristic of sacred sites are compared with random points in the area. Vegetation of sacred sites did not differ significantly from random, while useful and endemic plants did, as suggested by the Tibetan Doctors. Based on these preliminary data, we propose a more detailed plant community study with Tibetan doctors on ethnobotany of sacred sites.

Speaker: Danica Anderson is a Religious Studies and Biology major at Washington University. She will present this paper at the Annual Convention of the Society of Ethnobiology, Seattle, Washington, March 26-29, 2003, http://www.ethnobiology.org/

(See also Dr. Greg Fields' presentation).

(Picture taken on 3/24/03, Sophia/ATMA Religion in Medicine Symposium)

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OPEN FORUM

FREE FOOD FROM BON APPETIT!

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Information tables will be available, for distribution of information on Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Integrative Medicine, Humanistic Medicine, spirituality, religious therapeutics, etc. Brief informal presentations are invited on diverse topics, including aromatherapy, dance therapy, midwifery, Qi Gong, Tai Chi, Chinese martial arts, Reiki, energy medicine, curanderos, exorcism, etc. If you would like to participate, or know someone to recommend, please email Dr. Jerome Bauer at JeromBauer@aol.com, or call 314-725-1470. or email Jim Prell, jsprell@artsci.wustl.edu. Volunteers are needed, and new ideas are welcome!

The University City health food store, Wholistic Solutions, will have an informtion table, with free samples. Brochures from the Animal Health and Healing clinic and Mystic Valley will be distributed, as well as copies of Pathfinder Magazine and other publications.

We will also distribute brochures describing local academic programs in Religious Studies, Philosophy, Philosophy/Neuroscience/Psychology, History and Philosophy of Science, and Washington University's new Medical Humanities and Social Sciences Working Group, to name a few.

Those wishing to distribute information please register at the door. Sophia and ATMA members will assist you; they will be identifiable by their golden badges.


PARTICIPANTS SOUGHT, RECOMMENDATIONS WELCOME!

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED!

Do you know someone who would like to present at our Symposium? Would you like to speak? Do you have suggestions or comments? Would you like to volunteer? Would you like to join Sophia: The Religious Studies Discussion Club?

Students please contact Jim Prell, jsprell@artsci.wustl.edu

Faculty, staff, and others please contact Dr. Jerome Bauer, JeromBauer@aol.com

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