WashU Coop's
Earth Healing Month Events Calendar


(Including the
Religion in Medicine Symposium Series)
(
Washington University Campus Map)

Abstracts & Bios 

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Quick Index: Speakers

Topics list

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Ayurveda and Yoga Science
(Dr. Leonard Perlmutter, American Meditation Institute)
Saturday, April 1, 1:00-2:30pm, Ursa's Fireside Lounge

Abstract: This talk builds on the paradigm of Herbert Benson, MD, who emphasizes self-care, prevention, and strengthening of the immune system. Perlmutter shows how Indian philosophy and practice of health-care can serve these purposes.

Speaker: Leonard Perlmutter is the founding director of the American Meditation Institute in Albany, NY, and is a knowledgeable practitioner and teacher of Yoga and meditation, who is competent in Ayurveda. He has a new a book, The Heart and Science of Yoga.

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Earth Day Celebration
(WashU Green Council''s Earth Day Committee)
Friday, April 14, 11:00am-4:00pm, Bowles Plaza

Abstract: Earth Day is the annual celebration of the environment. Student and community groups participate in this event which promotes education and enjoyment of the earth.

Organizers: The Green Council is composed of campus environmental groups, including the WashU Coop, Green Action, Green Givens, and others.

(See also John Ikderd's presentation, the Coop Panel, and the Focus Panel)

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Sustainable Capitalism: Toward a Post-Fossil Energy Economy
(Dr. John Ikerd, University of Missouri, Columbia)
Tuesday, May 2, 2:30-4:00pm, January Hall Room 110

Abstract: Over the past half-century, capitalist economics has deviated from its original ethical and social purpose. Recently, capitalism has mutated into an amoral quest for economic growth at any cost. A relentless pursuit of profits and the "bottom line" poses a constant threat to civil society and the natural environment. The sustainability, indeed survival, of earth and the life upon it, is at risk under this brand of unfettered capitalism.

In order to maintain a new economics of sustainability, social and ethical values must be reintegrated into capitalist economics, thus restoring a sense of balance into the economic system that ensures that communities the world over will benefit and thrive. Sustainable Capitalism: A Matter of Common Sense suggests how capitalism can become a vehicle for these ends.

Both a penetrating critique of capitalism and an exploration of its vast and untapped potential for maximizing human welfare, Sustainable Capitalism: A Matter of Common Sense is written for a wide audience, including students and professors whose fields and interests embrace development, economics, ecology, sociology, and cultural anthropology. Those concerned with the future of our planet and the continued viability of global capitalism will regard this book as a vital addition to their libraries.

This presentation is a special session of FOCUS 2311, "Cooperative Living, Community Building, and Sustainability."

Speaker: Dr. John Ikerd spent the first half of his thirty-year academic career as a traditional free-market, neoclassical economist. He served on the faculties of four major state universities during his career: North Carolina State University, Oklahoma State University, the University of Georgia, and the University of Missouri. Growing concerns for the lack of ecological, social, and economic sustainability of American agriculture during the 1980s led to broader concerns for the lack of sustainability for American society in general. As an economist, Dr. Ikerd eventually came to understand that growing threats to ecological and social sustainability are rooted in the neoclassical paradigm of economic development, which is inherently extractive and exploitative, and thus, is not sustainable. Dr. Ikerd spent the last half of his academic career and much of his time since retirement developing and testing the concepts and principles of an alternative development paradigm, the economics of sustainability, which are elucidated in this book.

(See also Focus Panel, Coop Panel, and Earth Day)

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Religiuos Therapeutics and Sacred Art in Native Northwest, Hindu, and Tibetan Buddhist Traditons (Title TBA)
(Dr. Gregory P. Fields, Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville)
Tuesday, May 2, 4:00-5:30pm, January Hall Room 110

Abstract: TBA

[Two years ago, Professor Fields delivered a Microsoft PowerPoint presentation based on his book, "Religious Therapeutics: Body and Health in Yoga, Ayurveda, and Tantra," and subsequent research. He attempted to explain the connection between religion and medicine in the Native Northwest Coast, based on the Hindu traditions of Yoga, Ayurveda, and Tantra]

[Go to Greg Fields talk, 2003]
[Go to Greg Fields talk, 2004]

Speaker: Gregory Fields received the Ph.D. in Comparative Philosophy from the University of Hawaii in 1994. He is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, in comparative philosophy and religious studies, with specialization in South Asian and American Indian traditions. He teaches in the Department of Philosophical Studies. Professor Fields joined the SIUE faculty in 1995, with a teaching focus in multicultural and interdisciplinary studies, and critical thinking.He is faculty advisor for the new interdisciplinary minor in Religious Studies. He chairs Friends of the Religious Center at SIUE, founded to help the Center increase its programs in religious education, practice, and interfaith cooperation.

Professor Fields is author of Religious Therapeutics: Body and Health in Yoga, Ayurveda, and Tantra (State University of New York Press, 2001), and published in India by Motilal Banarsidass Press (2002). Other publications include a chapter on the purification rite or sweatlodge in The Black Elk Reader (Syracuse University Press, 2000), which addresses problems of misappropriation of indigenous traditional knowledge. Presentations include "American Indian Homeland: Exploitation of Land and of Indigenous Environmental Philosophy" at the Eighth East-West Philosophers' Conference in Honolulu. In August 2000, he presented "Healing the Body Politic: Dharma and Social Justice in Ambedkar's Response to Gandhi" in Calcutta, India.

Professor Fields' central research interest is religious therapeutics -relations between religion and healing,and application of philosophies of healing in the domains of medicine, psychology, education, and socio-political life. He has continuing interests in native Northwest Coast healing and spirituality, and in the work of Carl G. Jung. His current research interest is Tibetan Buddhist psychotherapeutics.

Go to Professor Fields' Homepage

Red Cedar Circle Photo Gallery

Red Cedar Circle Links Page

(See also the presentations of Dr. Perlmutter and the Red Cedar Circle of Southern Illinois).

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Red Cedar Circle: Medicine Circle and Songs of the SiSiWiss Medicine Way of the Native Northwest Coast
(Red Cedar Circle of Southern Illinois)
Tuesday, May 2, 5:30-6:00pm, January Hall Room 110

Abstract: SiSíWiss is one of many spiritual medicine ways of the native Northwest coast. One meaning of 'medicine' is spiritual power that is healing. SiSíWiss originates in the Pacific Northwest in the region of the San Juan islands around Seattle and Vancouver Island. In the Samish language, the word SiSíWiss means "sacred breath, sacred life" (si: sacred, wiss: breath). Red Cedar Circle is another native name for the SiSíWiss medicine society. Red represents the blood of Mother Earth, the life-force. Cedar is very sacred to the people, it is burned for blessing; the smoke carries the prayers. The circle is sacred, everything in nature moves in a circle.

Quoting Johnny Moses, of the Tulalip Nation:

"There are so many different types of medicine in the Northwest Coast…different types of medicine circles or societies. When I was growing up, I was raised in many different types of societies. A lot of them I'm not allowed to talk about because of tradition.

The type of medicine that we call SiSíWiss is a medicine that is shared to anyone; to help anyone that is in need, anyone who is having a hard time, or who wants to use healing-- if they want to use it in their artwork or music, or hands-on healing, or visiting people, they learn this type of medicine that we are sharing today. The Red Cedar Circle is an open circle, open to the people because of the prophecies of our grandmothers and grandfathers that are coming true. They say that the Teachings are going to go out and reach people because we are getting closer to the changes of the earth, the destructions, poisons that are being put into the earth. The people in this medicine are going to be able to help people, to heal the earth and each other, to help with the suffering that is going on. We are trying to share in many places. There are four of us younger people from our country, from the Northwest Coast, who were sent by our elders to share the medicine with people who wanted to follow it in a good way, to be clean and to help brothers and sisters, and especially to help yourself. That is why is follow this medicine."

Along with practice of SiSíWiss medicine in native communities in the Northwest, there are a number of Red Cedar Circles in the U.S. and Canada, mainly in the West. The Red Cedar Circle of Southern Illinois has been meeting for 8 years to study and practice SiSíWiss medicine, and we have hosted Johnny Moses five times, for public gatherings and to help our circle. We hold an open Red Cedar Circle for song, prayer, and Teachings, once a month, and all are welcome. The gathering is held the first Saturday of the month (except January) at the Religious Center (the geodesic dome) at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. Potluck at 1pm, Medicine Circle at 2pm. The main way of praying and doing healing work in this tradition is song. We are blessed to have heard and learned many songs. There are healing songs (with and without drumming), songs for the four seasons, chants in the native languages, and Indian Shaker songs, which use handbells instead of drums.

At Washington University on May 2nd, we will hold a Red Cedar Medicine Circle with the participation of those in attendance. This song ceremony is one of many SiSíWiss healing ceremonies . The singing of medicine songs-- and hearing and feeling them-- and the spirits of the songs, are all considered in this tradition to have healing power. It is a ceremony of reverence, in thanks to the Spirit and to the Mother Earth, and a way to request help in hearing the Teachings of the Spirit and the Mother Earth. It is also a ceremony of laughter and fellowship, and a celebration of the abundance and joy of our human life.

Speakers: The Red Cedar Circle of Southern Illinois.

Red Cedar Circle Photo Gallery

Red Cedar Circle Links Page

Link to Red Cedar Circle Homepage

(See also Dr. Fields' presentation).

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Integrative Medicine
(Dr. Simon Yu, Washington University School of Medicine)
Tuesday, April 25, 7:00-8:00pm, The Perry, 6021 Pershing

Abstract: A Power Point presentation over dinner at the Coop.

Speaker : Dr. Simon Yu has been practicing Internal Medicine since 1984, and Complementary and Alternative Medicine(CAM) since 1994.  Dr. Yu has been a Center Medical Director for Managed Care.  To understand his philosophy and decision to change his practice to Complementary and Alternative Medicine, see the "About Our Practice" page.

Dr. Yu received his B.S. degree from Washington University, and did postgraduate research in Diabetes at Washington University Medical Center.  He earned a Masters of Science Degree from research on Immunology through a joint program at Washington University Medical Center and University of Missouri-St. Louis.  Subsequently, he graduated from the University of Missouri-Columbia, School of Medicine in 1984 and completed residency training at St. Mary's Health Center in St. Louis.  

Dr. Yu lectures around the world and has studied Biological Medicine extensively in Europe.  Dr. Yu sponsors an annual conference on Complementary and Alternative Medicine (see the page "Alternative Medicine Conference").    Dr. Yu serves as a Colonel in the U.S. Army Reserve.  

Dr. Yu has hospital admitting privileges at Missouri Baptist Medical Center.

Dr. Yu is a Clinical Instructor at Washington University Medical School in St. Louis.

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Defining and Integrating "Cooperation," "Community," "Sustainability," "Spirituality," "Earth Healiog"
(Students in FOCUS 2310-11, "Cooperative Living, Community Building, and Sustainability")
Tuesday, May 2, 7:00-8:00pm, The Perry, 6021 Pershing (tentative)

Abstract: This session features individual and group presentations, and a panel discussion, of the final projects of students in FOCUS 2310-2311, "Cooperative Living, Community Building, and Sustainability," Washington University's two-semester Freshman course in Environmental Humanities and Utopian Studies.

Speakers: Students in FOCUS 2310-11.

(See also John Ikderd's presentation, the Coop Panel, and the Earth Day celebration)

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How to Start a Cooperative: Practical, Political, Legal, Ethical, and Spiritual Dimensions"
(Founding Members of Local Cooperatives, TBA)
Tuesday, May 2, 8:00-9:00pm, The Perry, 6021 Pershing (tentative)

Abstract: A panel discussion by founding members of local cooperatives, sharing their experience with the potential founders of new cooperatives.

Speakers: Founding members of local cooperatives

(See also John Ikderd's presentation, the Focus Panel, and the Earth Day celebration)

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OPEN FORUM

FOOD FROM THE KITCHENS OF THE WASHU COOPERATIVE!

Information tables will be available, for distribution of information on Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Integrative Medicine, Humanistic Medicine, spirituality, religious therapeutics, etc. Brief informal presentations are invited on diverse topics, including aromatherapy, dance therapy, midwifery, Qi Gong, Tai Chi, Chinese martial arts, Reiki, energy medicine, curanderos, exorcism, etc. If you would like to participate, or know someone to recommend, please email Dr. Jerome Bauer at jerohmehb@sbcglobal.net or call 314-725-1470. Volunteers are needed, and new ideas are welcome!

We will also distribute brochures describing local academic programs in Religious Studies, Special Major in Consciousness Studies, History and Philosophy of Science, and Washington University's Medical Humanities and Social Sciences Working Group, to name a few.

Those wishing to distribute information please register at the door. WashU Coop and ATMA members will assist you.


PARTICIPANTS SOUGHT, RECOMMENDATIONS WELCOME!

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED!

Do you know someone who would like to present at our Symposium? Would you like to speak? Do you have suggestions or comments? Would you like to volunteer? Would you like to join the Washington University Cooperative Network, the Religion in Medicine Organizing Group (RIMOG), or the ATMA Hindu Students Association?

Students please contact WashU Coop,, washucoop@yahoo.com to join the Coop, Sarah Lesser, sjlesser@artsci.wustl.edu, to join the Social Consciousness Committee..

Faculty, staff, and others please contact Dr. Jerome Bauer, jeromehb@sbcglobal.net,

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